Evaluation of anxiolytic and anti-depressant activity of Neolamarckia cadamba in mice

Authors

  • Akwinder Kaur St. Soldier Institute of Pharmacy, Lidhran Campus, Behind NIT (R.E.C), Jalandhar-Amritsar by pass NH-1 Jalandhar-144011, Punjab, India
  • Ajeet Pal Singh St. Soldier Institute of Pharmacy, Lidhran Campus, Behind NIT (R.E.C), Jalandhar-Amritsar by pass NH-1 Jalandhar-144011, Punjab, India
  • Amar Pal Singh St. Soldier Institute of Pharmacy, Lidhran Campus, Behind NIT (R.E.C), Jalandhar-Amritsar by pass NH-1 Jalandhar-144011, Punjab, India

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.47957/ijpda.v9i4.492

Keywords:

Neolamarckia cadamba, ethanolic, methanolic, Anxiolytic and Anti-depressant activity, mice

Abstract

Objective: Evaluation of anxiolytic and anti-depressant activity of Neolamarckia cadamba in mice.

Material & Method: The aqueous and methanolic extract of “Neolamarckia cadamba” and chose low medium and high doses for therapy. The behavioral consequences of an oral acute or subacute (10 days) treatment. Neolamarckia cadamba (250 and 500 mg/kg, p.o) aqueous and methanolic stem bark extract assessed in male and female Swiss mice (EPM). Diazepam (1 mg/kg) will also be evaluated. Anti-anxiety drug testing in the lab.

Results: Neolamarckia cadamba,  acute oral toxicity was detected with different extracts (ENC & AQNC) having dose  (5, 50, 300, 1000 mg/kg ) via the oral route,  shows no change in behavioral responses and observation shows no acute oral toxicity. Hence depending upon it, Dose was selected 250 mg/kg & 500 mg/kg for our experimental work.

Conclusion: Neolamarckia cadamba has both anxiolytic and antidepressant properties, which likely operate through BZD receptors, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The antidepressant and anxiolytic properties of Neolamarckia cadamba ethanolic and aqueous extracts were investigated in Swiss albino mice at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg, respectively. Both extracts (ANC & ENC) showed strong antidepressant and anxiolytic efficacy using TST and EPM parameters.

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References

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Published

2021-12-31
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How to Cite

Kaur, A. ., A. P. . Singh, and A. P. . Singh. “Evaluation of Anxiolytic and Anti-Depressant Activity of Neolamarckia Cadamba in Mice”. International Journal of Pharmaceutics and Drug Analysis, vol. 9, no. 4, Dec. 2021, pp. 254-61, doi:10.47957/ijpda.v9i4.492.

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